slotherhouse poster ‘Slotherhouse’ Wins PETA Award | PETA

‘Slotherhouse’ Wins PETA Award | PETA




A “Slotherhouse Rules!” Award from PETA is on its way to the creatives behind the new horror-comedy film Slotherhouse, recognizing writers Bradley Fowler and Cady Lanigan and director Matthew Goodhue for using puppetry instead of a real sloth and for sharing a powerful anti-poaching message with viewers.

The campy slasher film tells the story of Alpha, a sloth who rightfully exacts revenge after she’s snatched from her home and forced to live as a sorority mascot in order to draw attention on social media. Spoiler alert! The few who survive her maniacal killing spree learn their lesson: By the film’s end, the sorority sisters form an activist group called “FETCH” (For Ethical Treatment, Care, and Humanity) to discourage owning exotic animals.

Slotherhouse is more than funny—it’s an opportunity to side with the frustrated animals who are taken from their habitats and exploited for clout and entertainment. PETA is delighted to honor the film’s creatives for driving home their anti-poaching message by using impressive puppets instead of suffering captive wild animals. Bravo!”

—Lisa Lange, PETA Senior Vice President

Using wild animals such as bears, snakes, big cats, monkeys, sloths, wolves, and elephants for entertainment is inherently cruel, and there is never a situation in which it’s acceptable to use them in a movie or on a TV show. PETA’s undercover investigations as well as law-enforcement probes into animal suppliers for the film and TV industries have documented that animals are whipped and kept in deplorable conditions.

While many filmmakers and TV producers understand that animals aren’t ours to exploit for entertainment, some still need to be persuaded—and that’s where viewers come in. By avoiding movies and shows that use live wild animals, the public can send a powerful message to Hollywood that profits won’t come without principles and that we expect producers to keep animals out of their projects.

If you see animals being used for film or television productions, be sure to report it at PETA.org/Report or call the whistleblower hotline at 323-210-2233.



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