Pearl the Pig’s Story: ‘Teacup Pigs’ Don’t Exist


When Logan Paul bought Pearl the pig, he said the sellers told him she was a “mini pig”—a species that doesn’t exist. Two years later, after being rehomed more than once, she was found loose in a field, suffering from a life-threatening infection, along with the body of another pig.

Although Pearl is now receiving care at The Gentle Barn where she will spend the rest of her life, her story is just the latest cautionary tale that proves animals are a lifetime commitment, should never be bought or bred, and should never be adopted by anyone who isn’t willing and able to provide them with appropriate lifetime care.

PETA Hopes Pearl the Pig’s Story Helps End the Teacup Pig Myth

“Mini pigs,” “teacup pigs,” and “micro pigs” don’t exist. Pigs sold under these labels are usually malnourished potbellied piglets who, when they’re fed properly, grow to normal pig size, sometimes exceeding 100 pounds. These deceptive names are examples of false advertising and are used by breeders who treat animals as a commodity to be bought and sold, not as the individuals they are.

Just like “purebred” dogs—animals bred to have certain genetic traits or features—pigs who are intentionally bred to keep them small can, according to a report by Rachel Virginia, suffer from “a host of health issues resulting from reduced genetic diversity, such as squished snouts, which cause breathing problems later in life.” Breeders also underfeed these animals in order to stunt their growth and then instruct their guardians to feed their new companions a restricted diet, too.

Pearl is now safe at a sanctuary that will be able to provide her with the love, space, food, and care she needs to thrive.

Make Sure You’re Ready for a Lifelong Commitment Before You Adopt

Pet stores and breeders are major players in an uncaring and deadly industry. Treated as disposable merchandise, countless animals, including falsely labeled pigs like Pearl, are bred into the pet trade every year. They’re ultimately sold to anyone willing to pay for them, and the resulting animal suffering is immeasurable. With millions of homeless animals in U.S. shelters at any given time, there’s no such thing as “responsible breeding,” and if someone is profiting from the sale of an animal, you can bet that animal welfare was never their priority. That’s why PETA is on a mission to end animal suffering in the pet trade. Together, we can break the cycle of breeding and buying that drives the U.S. companion animal overpopulation crisis.

If you’re certain that you have the time, money, ability, desire, and dedication needed to provide an animal with a lifetime of care, please give an animal a second chance at life and love by adopting from a shelter.





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